"La labor de la traducción" 

"La labor de la traducción" 

Moshe's refrain throughout the translation process was: "Every word has a rhyme. There is always a solution!" 

When Moshe smiles, he lights up the room.

When Moshe smiles, he lights up the room.

The experience of working with Moshe this past summer has changed me forever. As the days progress, I probably will realize more and more what this means for me going forward. To read some of my preliminary feelings and thoughts attempting to process this experience, see here

Only a few minutes before seeing about Charlottesville on TV.

Only a few minutes before seeing about Charlottesville on TV.

August 2017 

 

See my piece from the Jerusalem Post that reflects upon my experience of learning about the attack in Charlottesville while with Moshe, here

Thanks to generous support I received from several organizations and individuals who decided to partner with me to with this project, I was able to complete a preliminary translation of "La Djovenika al Lager" to English after many, many hours of conversation and collaboration with Moshe.

I learned so much over the last month! I wrote copious notes and catalogued every anecdote and story. Moshe learned some things too-- including what a #hashtag is and how difficult it is to write in iambic heptameter in English! 

Every time I wrote a word in English that Moshe did not like, he would put it in red, so naturally of course, my favorite word in Hebrew is now: שָׁחוֹר!

 

Moshe's dream is that the entire poem and the hymn will become the International Hymn of Holocaust remembrance. Both the poem and the hymn were written in honor of his little sister, Nina, who perished at Auschwitz the same day she arrived there from Thessaloniki. Referring to Nina and the Nazis, the most important two lines of the entire poem are the following: 

 

"They shout to her and beat her, each hit assaults her frame, The number on her left arm, from now becomes her name."